98-100 Yandilla Street, Pittsworth, QLD, 4356

pittsworth vet surgery phone details - Right Business Hours

07 4693 2233

pittsworth vet surgery emergency phone number right After Hours

0429 932 233

98-100 Yandilla Street, Pittsworth, QLD, 4356

pittsworth vet surgery phone details - Right Business Hours

07 4693 2233

pittsworth vet surgery emergency phone number right After Hours

0429 932 233

Bull Semen Evaluation

We strongly recommend getting all bulls intended for use that season semen tested at least 2 months before they are intended to be bred with to allow for any problems that may arise to rectify themselves as well as time to look for a replacement bull if necessary. This allows you to eliminate bulls with poor semen quality, which are likely subfertile and even completely infertile in cases.

Why waste a whole year to find out at pregnancy testing, or even worse the following year when you await calving that your bull was not working?

 

Bull Semen Testing Steps

Bull testing involves several steps – it’s not just checking the semen!

  • History collecting e.g. Has the bull had a history of low pregnancy rates?
  • Basic visual appraisal looking for external abnormalities such as lameness, swollen testicles, feet issues, eye issues
  • Palpation of the accessory sex glands per rectum
  • Palpation of the testicles and surrounding structures for tone, symmetry and abnormalities
  • Measuring the testicles – testicle size in relation to breed and weight has a direct correlation with fertility of progency produced
  • Check the penis for abnormalities
  • Electroejaculation to collect semen
  • Semen is then checked for concentration
  • The microscope is then used to check sperm for progressive motility (so the percentage alive and moving forward)
  • Semen can be sent off to look at semen morphology which looks for abnormalities with the structure of the sperm. We look to have a minimum of 70% normal sperm in the sample to ensure that fertilisation of an egg is optimised.  We then look at the individual sperm and see if any defects exist such as proximal droplets, head or tail detachments, presence of vacuoles. All of these defects have a maximum amount that can be present that won’t interfere with conception.  The different defects can also determine what may be happening in the reproductive system that is affected and prognosis for recovery.  Morphology is best used on multiple samples collected to determine that the problem found is continual and not just a bad sample on the day.

Abnormalities can be found at any of these steps, and many of the problems we find can cause a direct decrease in conception rates.

 

How Often Should You Do It?

When you calculate the cost of having empty cows on your property it well and truly covers the cost of getting bulls tested each year – so it only makes sense to be a smart producer and get your sires tested! Just because a bull was tested as a 2yo at the time of sale does not mean that he will continue to pass tests from year to year. Hence we recommend testing every year at least 1-2 months prior to mating.

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Business Hours Phone: 07 4693 2233